#architecturefail

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Memorable homes from Grand Designs UK

Grand Designs, possibly the best TV show of all time. View a slideshow of a few memorable homes from the UK series at Memorable Homes from Grand Designs – I like the Berkshire home, which is your favourite?

Berkshire Home

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DIY Hacks for Spoiled Dogs

These DIY Hacks for Spoiled Dogs Are Either Genius or Insane…via Unique Hunters.

dog urinal drinking fountain

Featuring: bottom drawers used to house dog bowls, hotel awnings for dog doors, indoor dog houses, garden fire hydrants and walk in showers designed specifically for cleaning off your pups.

All of them are clever solutions, but are they going a bit too far? Or can you never do enough for our best furry friends?

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Buying a block of land to build a new home? Four things you should know

Congratulations! You have decided to buy a block of land and build your own home. The decisions you make next could determine whether the project is a success or a journey full of frustration.land for sale

Four things you should know When Buying a Block Of Land

Before proceeding with the purchase of your chosen site it is recommended you start talking to a registered architect. This may or may not cost you 1 or 2 hours of their time but it will be a worthwhile investment before making this substantial purchase. Your architect will be able to give you feedback on what is possible on your chosen site and address some important questions:

1. How much space can i build on this site?

Building sites often have limitations on the amount of space you can gave on the block often referred to as site cover or floor space ratio. i.e. if you are planning a 800 square metre mansion on a 500 square metre block of land I would suggest rethinking your purchase to avoid possible planning approval implications.

2. Will Building on A sloping site be more expensive?

In general, yes, having a sloping site is likely to be add to the cost at slab stage. But, this is often influenced by the builder you select. In my experience, builders that are not used to building on sloping sites will often add a premium to the construction cost to cover themselves for construction methods they are not accustomed to using such as split level slabs. High volume project builders have a reputation for trying to turn sloping sites into flat platforms to accommodate their standard designs. Quite often the money you save (in these instances) in slab cost is later spent on additional excavation costs and landscape retaining walls. Builders that are not deterred, and have experience with sloping sites, will tend to take a more conservative approach. A builder will often suggest the best design for the site based on the types of construction techniques they prefer to build. Your architect will provide unbiased suggestions on the best and most cost effective way to design for the site then suggest builders that are better suited to your project.

3. How will the planning controls affect my project?

When you design your home from scratch and it is designed within the planning controls, it means you avoid a lot of the headaches associated with the approval process. An architect with a thorough understanding of the planning controls associated with your site will be able to educate you on the planning constraints that exist for your site.

4. Is it important which way The site faces?

The north point will indicate the best position for your living spaces on the site relative to the opportunities for views. If your ideal site views are to the east or west your architect may suggest some form of screening or other design solution to accommodate.

In summary, it is always best to have your home designed from scratch to best cater for the topography, planning constraints and views that exist on the site. A brief consultation with a registered architect will paint a clearer picture of what can be achieved prior to settlement on your dream block of land.

Feel free to contact me via Facebook or my website www.mdarchiects.com.au with any questions.

Buying a block of land to build a new home? Four things you should know